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U.S. Army Europe and Africa Mission & History

Shoulder Sleeve Insignia

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Supreme Headquarters, Allied Expeditionary Forces Dec. 13, 1944.  The insignia was re-designated for United States Army Europe and Africa Jan. 22, 2021.

Distinctive Unit Insignia

US Army Europe Distinctive Unit Insignia

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for United States Army Europe July 27, 1970. The insignia was re-designated for United States Army Europe and Africa Jan. 22, 2021.

Watch: U.S. Army Europe and Africa Command Video
U.S. Army Europe and Africa by the Numbers
  • 41,000 U.S. Army Soldiers throughout Europe and Africa with more than 62,000 family members
  • 14,000 Department of the Army civilians throughout Europe with more than 21,000 family members
  • 9,000 local nationals employed by the U.S. Army in Europe
  • 6,000 Regionally Allocated Forces rotating through Europe in support of Atlantic Resolve
  • 300 community outreach events with our host nations each year (Pre-Coronavirus)
  • 200 public events supported by the U.S. Army Europe Band and Chorus each year (Pre-Coronavirus)
  • 104 countries in our area of responsibility
  • 60+ exercises each year with more than 75+ countries and 80,000+ multinational participants
  • 37 European and African nations participating in the State Partnership Program 
  • 7 U.S. Army Garrisons in 3 countries
  • 9 major subordinate units
  • 5 Army Prepositioned Stock sites, 1 worksite and 1 European Enduring Equipment Set
  • 3 Multinational Response Forces:
    • East Africa Response Force
    • Northwest Africa Response Force
    • NATO Response Force
  • 3 Area Support Groups – Poland, Black Sea and Balkans
  • 2 training development efforts with partner nations 
  • 2 battle groups in support of NATO missions:
  • 1 Security Force Assistance Brigade

View and print the U.S. Army Europe and Africa Fact Sheet

About
History
D-Day

On June 6, 1944 the United States military participated in the largest multinational amphibious landing and operational military airdrop in history. By the end of the D-Day invasion, more than 9,000 allied troops were dead or wounded. U.S. troops remain forever indebted to WWII veterans for their selfless service and sacrifice and proudly participate in D-Day commemorations each year. Click here to view stories, photos and videos from this year's events. ​

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